PT30M
Serves 4
    Hungarian cottage cheese pasta

    Hungarian Cottage Cheese Pasta (Túrós csusza)

    Pasta became a part of Hungarian gastronomy somewhere at the beginning of the modern era.  József Topits founded the first steam pasta factory in 1859 in Budapest which allowed the large-scale production of pasta. What makes this Hungarian cottage cheese pasta unique is the special combination of  warm pasta cooked with cottage cheese and mixed with hot, crisp bacon strips. This combination is scrumptious as the cottage cheese melts into the pasta. Traditionally the pasta was torn into pieces, I prefer to make my own egg pasta and cut them into soft pillows.

    Káposztás Tészta is another noodle dish made with cabbage and bacon or with a dumpling called Nokedili which is very delicious and unique. The Hungarians are known for their variety of pasta dishes and everyone of them my children gobbled up at dinner.

    Hungarian cottage cheese pasta

    12 oz. wide noodle

    16 oz. small curd cottage cheese

    1/2 lb. bacon, chopped into small pieces

    1/2 tablespoons Hungarian paprika

    2 tablespoons sour cream (optional)

    Salt and pepper

    Fry the bacon in a large pan until crisp. Drain and set aside.

    Cook the pasta in salted boiling water. When it is al dente drain and add the cottage cheese. Cook on low until the cheese melted slightly, and everything is hot. Add the bacon, paprika and season with salt and pepper. If the pasta seems dry add sour cream to moisten.

    Serve immediately on a platter and sprinkle paprika.

    5 thoughts on "Hungarian Cottage Cheese Pasta (Túrós csusza)"

    1. Dar says:

      I love this dish ..have been making it for years but I was taught to put most of the bacon fat right in the dish.

    2. Me too! I keep the fat in it too!

    3. Eva says:

      Hi,

      Question, what kind of paprika? Sweet, hot, smoked, this looks like something I had while in Budapest and it was soooooooooo good!! I want to get it right – any brand recommendations would be greatly appreciated! Also, is it hard to make the noodles you do from scratch / have you posted the recipe for that? Thanks so much, excited to try!!

    4. Eva says:

      Hi,

      Question, what kind of paprika? Sweet, hot, smoked, this looks like something I had while in Budapest and it was soooooooooo good!! I want to get it right – any brand recommendations would be greatly appreciated! Also, is it hard to make the noodles you do from scratch / have you posted the recipe for that? Thanks so much, excited to try!!

    5. I use sweet Hungarian paprika from Hungary. A friend of mine brought it back for me from there. You can also buy sweet in most grocery stores, like Fred Meyer or Haggen. If you like a smokey flavor you could add a small amount with the sweet. Smoked paprika traditionally come form Spain. If you’d like to make Hungarian noodles you will find that recipe on my website https://culinaryimmigration.com/recipe/hungarian-egg-noodle/

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